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Sherri L Smith, PhD, AuD, CCC-A

Co-Chief, Division of Communication Sciences
Senior Fellow, Duke Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development
Associate Professor of Head and Neck Surgery & Communication Sciences
Associate Professor in Population Health Sciences
Office: 164 Baker House, Durham, NC 27710
Campus Mail: DUMC DUMC 3887, Durham, NC 27710

Dr. Smith's core research focuses on improving the assessment and treatment of hearing loss in older adults. Specifically, her work centers on comparing the effectiveness of current hearing interventions, developing new, innovative clinical tools, and examining alternative service-delivery approaches that help patients reach their individual hearing goals and improve their quality of life.

Dr. Smith also collaborates with multi-disciplinary teams to better understand the impact of hearing loss on other health conditions and services. Current projects involve understanding the impact of hearing loss on surgical outcomes in older adults, determining the mechanisms that may explain the independent association between hearing loss and falls in older adults, and comparing different models of hearing screenings for older adults in primary care settings.

Education and Training

  • Ph.D., University of Florida, 2003
  • Au.D., University of Florida, 2001
  • B.A., University of Florida, 1997

Publications

Pereira, A., J. Pattison, M. K. Pichora-Fuller, and S. L. Smith. “Effects of modality and linguistic materials on memory in younger and older adults.” Canadian Acoustics  Acoustique Canadienne 47, no. 3 (January 1, 2019): 100–101.

Scholars@Duke

Fagelson, Marc A., and Sherri L. Smith. “Tinnitus Self-Efficacy and Other Tinnitus Self-Report Variables in Patients With and Without Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.” Ear Hear 37, no. 5 (September 2016): 541–46. https://doi.org/10.1097/AUD.0000000000000290.

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Smith, Sherri L., Gabrielle H. Saunders, Theresa H. Chisolm, Melissa Frederick, and Beth A. Bailey. “Examination of Individual Differences in Outcomes From a Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial Comparing Formal and Informal Individual Auditory Training Programs.” J Speech Lang Hear Res 59, no. 4 (August 1, 2016): 876–86. https://doi.org/10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-15-0162.

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Saunders, Gabrielle H., Sherri L. Smith, Theresa H. Chisolm, Melissa T. Frederick, Rachel A. McArdle, and Richard H. Wilson. “A Randomized Control Trial: Supplementing Hearing Aid Use with Listening and Communication Enhancement (LACE) Auditory Training.” Ear Hear 37, no. 4 (July 2016): 381–96. https://doi.org/10.1097/AUD.0000000000000283.

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Chasteen, Alison L., M Kathleen Pichora-Fuller, Kate Dupuis, Sherri Smith, and Gurjit Singh. “Do negative views of aging influence memory and auditory performance through self-perceived abilities?” Psychol Aging 30, no. 4 (December 2015): 881–93. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0039723.

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Smith, Sherri L., and M Kathleen Pichora-Fuller. “Associations between speech understanding and auditory and visual tests of verbal working memory: effects of linguistic complexity, task, age, and hearing loss.” Front Psychol 6 (2015): 1394. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01394.

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Dupuis, Kate, M Kathleen Pichora-Fuller, Alison L. Chasteen, Veronica Marchuk, Gurjit Singh, and Sherri L. Smith. “Effects of hearing and vision impairments on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment.” Neuropsychol Dev Cogn B Aging Neuropsychol Cogn 22, no. 4 (2015): 413–37. https://doi.org/10.1080/13825585.2014.968084.

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Chisolm, Theresa Hnath, Gabrielle H. Saunders, Melissa T. Frederick, Rachel A. McArdle, Sherri L. Smith, and Richard H. Wilson. “Learning to listen again: the role of compliance in auditory training for adults with hearing loss.” Am J Audiol 22, no. 2 (December 2013): 339–42. https://doi.org/10.1044/1059-0889(2013/12-0081).

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